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The Book of Psalms: Reading, Studying, and Praying the Psalms

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What is the Bible and How Do We Make Sense of It?

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The Poetry and Movement of the Psalms
Speaker:
Date:
Mar 20, 2011
This class begins with an overview of the use of poetry versus prose in the Bible and why poetry plays an important role. We then discover the basic poetic elements within the Psalms, spending the most time unpacking the most common device of Hebrew poetry: parallelism. The class closes with a discussion of the movement within the Psalms, from hope to disappointment to trust and praise, by rivers, through valleys and deserts, ultimately culminating in an eruption of praise.

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